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Tom, The Bootblack (Annotated & Illustrated): The Road to Success

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Tom, The Bootblack (Annotated & Illustrated): The Road to Success.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Horatio Alger Jr.(Author)

    Book details


*This Book is annotated (it contains a detailed biography of the author). *An active Table of Contents has been added by the publisher for a better customer experience. *This book has been checked and corrected for spelling errors. Tom is a fifteen year old boy who lives in New York City with an old man named Jacob in Mrs. Flanagan’s rooming house. They pose as grandfather and grandson, but, while Tom understands that they are no real relation, he knows nothing about his real family. Tom makes a living for them both as a street bootblack. Just before Jacob dies, he tells the boy that he is really Gilbert Grey, the son of a wealthy Cincinnati, OH, businessman named John Grey. However, John’s brother James conspired with Jacob to spirit the child away, claiming that he drowned, so that James could inherit the family wealth. Jacob has written a confession explaining all the details. So after Jacob’s death, Tom, or Gilbert, heads for Cincinnati to see if he can locate his uncle and claim his fortune. What will he find? Can he succeed?

Horatio Alger, Jr. was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts in 1832, the son of a Unitarian minister. He received a strict upbringing and was educated for a life in the church, graduating from Harvard in 1852. After leaving Harvard, Alger, to his father's disappointment, took a job as a historian in Middlesex County, Massachusetts and later worked as a teacher at a boys' boarding school in East Greenwich, Rhode Island. He traveled in Europe for a year, and then returned to the United States in 1857 to complete his studies at the Cambridge Divinity School. In 1864 Alger was ordained a minister at the First Parish Unitarian Church of Brewster on Cape Cod. Sixteen months later, however, he was dismissed from the pulpit after being accused of engaging in homosexual relations with two boys. After his dismissal, Alger began to focus on his writing career, which spanned more than three decades and 110 books. He wrote mainly children's books about boys and girls who rise from rags to riches through hard work and faith in the American dream. His first major success came with the publication of his eighth novel, Ragged Dick in 1868. Other popular novels include Luck and Pluck (1869), Tattered Tom (1871), and Strive and Succeed (1872). Alger also wrote several adult novels, including A Fancy of Her's (first publihsed as The New Schoolma'am in 1877) and The Disagreeable Woman (1895). Alger, who never married, spent the last decades of his life living at his family home in South Natick, Massachusetts, where he died in 1899. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Book details

  • PDF | 133 pages
  • Horatio Alger Jr.(Author)
  • Independently published (September 5, 2017)
  • English
  • 7
  • Children's Books

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Review Text

  • By Karen A. Walker on August 28, 2014

    This was a gift and it was enjoyed by the person who it was given to. No problems with the condition of the book when it arrived.

  • By Wayne S. Walker on July 20, 2014

    Tom is a fifteen year old boy who lives in New York City with an old man named Jacob in Mrs. Flanagan’s rooming house. They pose as grandfather and grandson, but, while Tom understands that they are no real relation, he knows nothing about his real family. Tom makes a living for them both as a street bootblack. Just before Jacob dies, he tells the boy that he is really Gilbert Grey, the son of a wealthy Cincinnati, OH, businessman named John Grey. However, John’s brother James conspired with Jacob to spirit the child away, claiming that he drowned, so that James could inherit the family wealth. Jacob has written a confession explaining all the details. So after Jacob’s death, Tom, or Gilbert, heads for Cincinnati to see if he can locate his uncle and claim his fortune. What will he find? Can he succeed? Horatio Alger, Jr. (1832-1899) was a nineteenth-century American author who wrote approximately 135 novels, beginning with Ragged Dick in 1867, most of which have been described as rags to riches stories, illustrating how down-and-out boys might be able to achieve the American dream of wealth and success through hard work, courage, determination, and concern for others. The son of a Unitarian minister, Alger also became a Unitarian minister in Brewster, MA, but soon retired from the ministry and moved to New York City where he formed an association with the Newsboys Lodging House and other agencies offering aid to impoverished children. Alger's empathy with the young working men, coupled with the moral values he learned at home, formed the basis for his stories. He is noted as a significant figure in the history of American cultural and social ideals, even though his novels are rarely read these days. Tom the bootblack is a good role-model of honesty, hard work, and persistence. There are a couple of references to dancing, but the evils of alcoholic drink are strongly emphasized. The book is recommended by Nathaniel Bluedorn in Hand That Rocks the Cradle: 400 Classic Books for Children, saying, “These stories teach good character and the benefits of entrepreneurial business practices.” Though Alger’s books may be considered by some as hopelessly outdated and even “weird” today, I can easily see why young boys used to eat them up until they went out of style, and to be honest, even looked upon as pulp fiction, they are still a lot better than much of the trash that poses as young people’s literature in our time. At the end of Tom, the Bootblack, Alger apparently included a couple of short stories, one about Davie Cameron, a poor Scottish peasant who finds a buried treasure, and the other about a young boy named Lloyd who tries to save a schooner during a storm by building a fire on the beach. Faith in God is stressed in both.

  • By Nahalal Pepuza on December 14, 2016

    This work still speaks to a young teen's heart today if they have not already been corrupted by the purposes of the modern educational system. I first encountered it in the attic over our dairy barn where my Uncle who lived with us for a couple of years had left it in 1954 along with other of his childhood books. At 13, it had a huge impact on me and still resonates even today at 75. Though very dated, if the modern youth can manage to overlook this for a very few pages, he will enter a world over a century old as it was lived and will end up enthralled while cheering the young hero on his journey of discovery of the wonderful capacities that are inside him if he will stay true to his honor and strive lawfully against both circumstance and wickedness.

  • By Imerhil on January 14, 2016

    No MARC KLIEN TALE Ponzi MORE LIKE BUT WHO CAN TELLHE LEFT IT ALL OUT AND INTERVIEWED ELSEWHERE. THANKS FOR TRAST AND ROSE.nOT TOGETHER AS MUCH AS YOU THINK. FUR REAL. bUT TOMAS HIT NIBLE. if YOU BEING BUSINESS LIKE.nO SHAME LITTLE PARD. yOU ARE BEING THAT WAY. UNLESS YOU THE FRIED BEAN. OKAY!!

  • By R L Gans on September 8, 2014

    did not care for it at all


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