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Book The Grinder: One Community's Journey Through Pain and Hope from the Great Haiti Earthquake by Lee Rainboth (2013-09-05)

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The Grinder: One Community's Journey Through Pain and Hope from the Great Haiti Earthquake by Lee Rainboth (2013-09-05)

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  • CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (1640)
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Review Text

  • By julie johannsen on October 11, 2013

    The Grinder, One Community's Journey Through Pain and Hope from the Great Haiti Earthquake was a brilliantly written piece.It was written in a way that made me feel as though I were there experiencing it for myself. Flowed from one event to another easily, and was written with such emotion. Shed a light on the Haiti earthquake that I had not realized before. Great read!!

  • By Dean on January 21, 2014

    This book makes me want to pack up and visit Haiti.The Grinder is intense in so many ways. Intense emotions, intense pain, intense resilience but most of all intensely real. This book is the true story of the 2010 earthquake that rocked the Caribbean country of Haiti and, through its destruction, took the lives of hundreds of thousands of Haitians. Told through the first-hand account of the author - an American who has been living in Haiti for years - this book combines his own experiences with the experiences of many of his friends and acquaintances in the country.Told with often uncomfortably vivid language and details, the book soaks you in and takes you right to the heart of the country on the day of the massive earthquake and in the months and years that have followed. After reading just a few pages, I could imagine myself right there in Haiti along with the author and the book's profiled Haitians who lived to tell about it - experiencing the terrifying sights, smells and sounds of death and devastation.The author - Mr. Rainboth - spares no details. Sometimes this book is emotionally difficult to read, but something about it makes you want to keep turning page after painful page because from the very beginning there is an underlying feeling of hope. It's hard to explain, but even in this most awful of natural tragedies, this book somehow makes it obvious that Haitians are a strong, courageous, spiritual people who have an unwavering faith in something much more powerful than themselves.Even though The Grinder appears to be self-published - with a handful of grammar/typo issues here and there - it absolutely did not lessen the impact that the book had on me as a reader. There were several times that I cried. A couple of times that I chuckled and a few times where I almost couldn't believe what I was reading. The author describes a couple of instances that are impossible for me to wrap my mind around (demons, visible pillars of fire, the ocean parting to reveal dry ground, etc), but the accounts are told with such detail and commitment that it makes me want to believe that they actually did happen.The Grinder is an easy read that I completed in about three evenings. I would recommend this book to anybody, but particularly those who might have an interest in international travel, natural disasters or non-profit involvement in countries outside of the U.S.Read The Grinder. It will make you think about your life and the way you live it. It will make you prioritize what is truly important and it will likely make you want to pack up and go experience Haiti for yourself. I'm off to pack my bags.

  • By MVPrentice on April 28, 2014

    The Grinder: One Community's Journey Through Pain and Hope from the Great Haiti EarthquakeI visited Haiti for the first time last week and began reading this book on my first day. I couldn't put it down. Lee Rainboth writes in a way that makes you feel you're right there listening to his friends tell their stories. This book is a tribute to the survivors and a memorial to those who didn't.On the plane ride home, I finished the book and turned to my seat mate, an American of Haitian descent, and showed him "The Grinder." He took it and I figured he would hand it back to me in a few minutes. He didn't. He kept reading until our plane landed.It's that good. Thanks, Lee, for documenting what you and your friends and family experienced.

  • By go cyclones on December 28, 2013

    This is a beautifully written book of memories from that terrible day in Haiti. It acknowledges problems that are still unsolved, but leaves one with hope. The art in the book is profound.

  • By Different Voice on December 7, 2013

    Lee's account of the Haiti earthquake and his community's response was incredibly moving. I felt as if I was right there with him. The writing is beautiful and the depth of reflection upon the whole experience made this one of the best reads of the year for me. Once you read it, you'll not only look at all major tragedies differently, you'll want to take a trip to Haiti as soon as possible.

  • By Kindle Customer on September 23, 2013

    Having known Lee personally for several years and the wonderful work his is doing in Haiti I couldn't wait to read this book.I was not disappointed, now I know the trauma he and his "Haitian Family" experienced while all we could do stateside was prayfor his safety and the Haitian friends we knew in Mizak.


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