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Warriors

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Warriors.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    George R.R. Martin(Editor),Gardner Dozois(Editor)

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People have been telling stories about warriors for as long as they have been telling stories. Since Homer first sang the wrath of Achilles and the ancient Sumerians set down their tales of Gilgamesh, warriors, soldiers, and fighters have fascinated us; they are a part of every culture, every literary tradition, every genre.

People have been telling stories about warriors for as long as they have been telling stories. Since Homer first sang the wrath of Achilles and the ancient Sumerians set down their tales of Gilgamesh, warriors, soldiers, and fighters have fascinated us; they are a part of every culture, every literary tradition, every genre.

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Review Text

  • By Thomas E. Bradley Jr. on April 17, 2017

    It's not often you read a book that truly qualifies for a 5-star rating, but this one certainly does. Told both from the U.S. and Japanese sides of this horrible, bloody battle, the book is brimming with characters ranging from newly-minted Navy and Marine Corps fighter pilots to the admirals and generals who crafted the American strategy for the 95-day campaign. We also meet Japanese kamikaze pilots and their commanding officers, fighting a last-ditch battle they know they will never win, and crew members aboard the mighty Yamato, perhaps the greatest warship ever built -- and which met its fate as what was left of the once-formidable Imperial Japanese Navy engaged in its own effort to stave of an American invasion of their homeland. Mr. Gandt's writing is crisp and straightforward, and puts the read in the action -- from cockpits of Navy Corsair fighters engaged in dogfights with Japanese Zeros, to the decks of American ships as they bear the brunt of the kamikaze attacks, to the headquarters of Japanese admirals as they send their dedicated, loyal pilots to their doom. Well researched in addition to being well written, THE TWILIGHT WARRIORS makes no judgements and casts no aspersions; it simply tells the story of men at total war in the waning days of our globe's most devastating conflict.

  • By Jeffrey T. Munson on November 18, 2010

    By the spring of 1945, the Japanese had been driven west across the Pacific by the ever-increasing strength of the American Navy. Okinawa, only 350 miles from mainland Japan, was to be the final battle leading up to the invasion of Japan. Okinawa would serve as a major staging area as well as a base for aircraft. But before these preparations could be made, the Japanese garrison needed to be defeated. On April 1, 1945, the Americans stormed ashore. What laid ahead was the most costly naval battle of the war. Author Robert Gandt describes the naval aspect of the battle for Okinawa in "The Twilight Warriors".I've read several books about the battle for Okinawa, and this one is unique from the previous ones I've read. This book focuses specifically on the naval aspect of the fighting, while only mentioning the land battle in broad terms. Gandt pays particular attention to the kamikaze attacks, the suicide mission of the battleship Yamato, and the numerous air battles that took place in the area. The pilots who flew the planes were called "Tail-End Charlies", due to their status as late-comers to the war. These men also flew at the back of formations, stood at the end of chow lines, and even had their own sleeping quarters called "boys' town".Perhaps the area of greatest danger was the destroyer picket stations. These ships would intercept incoming kamikazes and radio ahead to the main fleet. The Japanese were soon setting out to destroy these ships, and many American destroyers were lost as a result of the kamikaze attacks.I felt Gandt did an especially good job of describing the suicide mission of the Yamato. He devotes several chapters to this story, and I was amazed at the possibility of this ship actually reaching the beaches at Okinawa, beaching itself, and firing on the American soldiers and ships. Fortunately, the "Tail-End Charlies" and other flyers sank the ship before it was too late.This is a fine work of World War II history. The writing is very good, and Gandt has done a thorough job of researching the aspects of the battle. Highly recommended.

  • By Teacher of Teachers on December 7, 2017

    This book has basically what is to me the right balance of grand strategy and individual human stories. For one thing it has a fair number of Japanese stories and, like the American side, gets into the divisions within the Japanese military.I could have used a little more on the psychology of the individual kamikaze flyer. Although the author seems pretty responsible about handling the Japanese angle, this specific aspect - I mean regarding individual young men - is presented kind of monochromatically. His treatment of the disagreements among their superiors seems more realistic. I don't know if there is a lot of material on the younger flyers. That's the missing piece for this otherwise nicely balanced account. It's noticeable because of (1) the well-written accounts of American flyers and (2) the fact, as he shows, that we sometimes know the names of the kamikaze pilots.The kamikaze affair is a strange business that could have used a little more examination, especially given its importance to Okinawa specifically.The author pulls no punches in describing what are essentially, I think, war crimes: that is, some American pilots shooting at Japanese pilots who are down in the water. This is good to describe, but the author would have done well to dwell on that. It's handled rather dismissively here.Finally, there is some really informative stuff on the land battle.A mixed book in some ways but very readable.


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