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Chronicles of the Schonberg-Cotta Family

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | Chronicles of the Schonberg-Cotta Family.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    Elizabeth Rundle Charles(Author)

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Elizabeth Rundle Charles (2 January 1828 – 28 March 1896) was an English writer. Some of her youthful poems won the praise of Tennyson, who read them in manuscript. Her best known book, written to order for an editor who wished for a story about Martin Luther, The Chronicles of the Schönberg-Cotta Family, was published in 1862, and was translated into most of the European languages, into Arabic, and into many Indian dialects. Mrs Charles wrote in all over fifty books, the majority of a semi-religious character, as well as writing and translating a number of hymns. Her works include The Voice of Christian Life in Song; or, Hymns and Hymn-writers of Many Lands and Ages (1859), The Three Wakings, and Other Poems (1859), Wanderings over Bible Lands and Seas (1862), The Early Dawn (1864), Winifred Bertram and the World She Lived In (1866), Poems (1867), The Draytons and the Davenants (1867), Songs Old and New (1882), and Conquering and to Conquer/The Diary of Brother Bartholomew. Our Seven Homes (1896) is autobiographical. A number of her hymns appeared in The Family Treasury, edited by William Arnot (1808–1875).

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Book details

  • PDF | 302 pages
  • Elizabeth Rundle Charles(Author)
  • CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (May 13, 2016)
  • English
  • 4
  • Literature & Fiction

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Review Text

  • By an apt word on February 21, 2017

    Written in the form of journal entries begun by the two oldest children of this family, Friedrich and Else, this book traces the history and conflicts faced by Martin Luther and the Christian Church in the early 16thc. The Schonberg-Cotta family are fictional printers tasked with distributing many pamphlets written by Martin Luther shortly after his historic posting of his theses on the church door at Wittenberg. Yet the history surrounding Martin Luther, Philip Melancthon, and Frederick of Saxony is verifiable. One comes to appreciate the unique difficulties of people living without the Book as the story of church corruption and tyranny unfolds. Particularly weighty are the institutions of convents and monasteries; tragic in that so many took lifelong oaths to remain there in a state of perpetual childhood, as described by one of the children. How freeing when Martin Luther’s comprehension and teaching of the gospel led people to question their own oaths and marry, as did 3 of the principals in this book. Written in the pietistic style common in Elizabeth R Charles’ 19thc, the characters are idealized to be sure, yet there is much in her observation of life, history, and theology that merits careful reflection.I purchased the book because I had always been intrigued by this quote: "It is the truth which is assailed in any age which tests our fidelity. It is to confess we are called, not merely to profess. If I profess, with the loudest voice and the clearest exposition, every portion of the truth of God except precisely that little point which the world and the devil are at that moment attacking, I am not confessing Christ, however boldly I may be professing Christianity. Where the battle rages the loyalty of the soldier is proved; and to be steady on all the battle-field besides is mere flight and disgrace to him if he flinches at that one point." This statement is sometimes falsely attributed to Martin Luther. It is Elizabeth Rundle Charles herself, who gives this conclusion to Fritz Schonberg-Cotta when he struggles with his monastic vows and the call to support his friend and mentor, Martin Luther.

  • By Sagacious on April 24, 2015

    It contains the following statement that is very appropriate for the times we live in when biblical truths about marriage and family are being assaulted and when Christians who hold to these unchanging biblical truths are being dragged into court, being forced to pay exorbitant fines, being fired from their jobs, and having their businesses shut down:"It is the truth which is assailed in any age which tests our fidelity. It is to confess we are called, not merely to profess. If I profess, with the loudest voice and the clearest exposition, every portion of the truth of God except precisely that little point which the world and the devil are at that moment attacking, I am not confessing Christ, however boldly I may be professing Christianity. Where the battle rages the loyalty of the soldier is proved; and to be steady on all the battle-field besides is mere flight and disgrace to him if he flinches at that one point."

  • By Sharon Toji on August 2, 2013

    I was telling someone, who had never heard about it, about Martin Luther and the German Reformation, and suddenly thought of this book, which I read as a child many, many years ago. It was a favorite book, and I read it several times. It formed my historic knowledge both of Martin Luther and the Reformation, and the invention and rise in popularity of the Gutenberg Printing Press. I'm thinking of ordering it so I can read it again, since I remember enjoying it very much when I read it, probably at about age 12. (I was a pretty advanced reader, so it probably isn't actually a child's book -- at least not in this day and age!)Later, when I actually studied religious history in college, I think I would have thought of this book as pretty accurate in many respects. Although it doesn't have as much "soap opera" feel to it as the recent trilogy on the master builders of the cathedrals, it does have something of the same atmosphere to it. You are definitely transported back to a time when religion formed the center of life, especially for the poor in Europe.

  • By baglady on February 4, 2016

    I read this book as a child and a few years ago managed to find a copy through a bookseller in Hay on Wye. I have always loved it, and through this book learned a great deal about history not dealt with in our Anglo-Saxon orientated version.


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